Sea Creatures exhibition offers an unrivalled insight into the ocean's depths

By Rose Adams | 10 Apr 2018 | Culture, Philanthropy

The marine exhibition will offer a never-before-seen look inside the world – and bodies – of 200 species

img tempus
* Sea Creatures: Life Beneath the Ocean provides an incredible insight into the environment and biology of some of the world's most mysterious ocean species

Prepare to immerse yourself into the deepest regions of the world's oceans as never-before-seen exhibition Sea Creatures: Life Beneath the Ocean comes to London. Showcasing over 200 species, the show will provide an incredible insight into the environment and biology of some of the world's most mysterious ocean species – with ethically-sourced cross-sections of animals including baleen whale, great white shark, dolphin, seal, octopus and sting ray.

Will a focus on the importance of marine conservation, the show will open at London's Royal Horticultural Halls from 20 July – 30 August, before starting a UK tour including Edinburgh and Belfast. Featuring a close look at 50 full-body specimens, 150 body parts, augmented reality and interactive exhibits that aims to take visitors into the deep.

Related: Return of the Mack: Tempus meets Artist Bill Mack as he brings unique Hollywood collection to London

img tempus
* Take a never-before-seen look into the what's inside some of the ocean's biggest beasts

“Our fascination with the oceans is unwavering and the chance to get up-close and hands on with these majestic creatures is an incredible experience," said Naz Kabir, whose company Culture Event Creative is bringing the exhibition to the UK in partnership with the Scottish Association for Maritime Science.

“Sea Creatures gives visitors the chance to learn about the animals who inhabit the same planet as us, but very rarely - if ever - cross our paths," he said. "Our interactive and tactile displays create an incredible opportunity to find out more about the creatures themselves, but also the many ways we can become involved in marine conservation and help to preserve the beautiful ocean life that is so important to us all.”

Each of the preserved displays use the same plastination process – replacing fluids and soluble fats with resins – developed by Dr. Gunther von Hagens. The technique was made famous by artist Damien Hirst in works including ‘The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living’, which featured a shark suspended in resin in a glass tank.  But it's not just the bodies of big beasts who are the stars of the show. Smaller displays include the lung and eyeball of a mink whale, a whale’s kidney, the egg of a king penguin, a sea lion’s heart and shark’s teeth. 

img tempus
* Each of the preserved displays use the same plastination process of replacing fluids and soluble fats with resins developed by Dr. Gunther von Hagens

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER UPDATES